Would you make a good nurse?

  • November 24, 2017

Many people considering a career in nursing often ask themselves, “Would I make a good nurse?” Nursing is something that does require some thought, as it is not simply a job, but a way of life.

If you would like a highly rewarding and challenging career, and your desire to help people overrides all else, nursing could be a career in which you could thrive.

As nursing roles are in demand, it has never been a better time to consider whether this is the perfect role for you. Below are some key reasons that you may wish to choose a career in nursing:

 

You care about helping others

Patient care and interaction is a big part of a nursing role, and your interaction with a patient could make the difference between them recovering or not recovering. Your work with them on a personal level is what makes a big difference to their experience in your care, and can have a very positive impact.

Nursing makes a huge difference in patient’s lives by providing hands on care and assisting complete strangers in leading a healthier life. If you are caring and know to listen, this will be an intrinsically rewarding career field to pursue.

 

You want a stable career and job security

Unfortunate as it is, people will always suffer from illnesses, which makes nursing a profession that will never leave you without an option for work. No matter where life takes you, you should always be able to find a job in order to support yourself.

Without nurses, the NHS that we rely so much upon would not function as it does today. Nurses implement the orders for doctors, perform a vital job in patient care, and make sure patients are comfortable and well looked after - making it a vital, and stable career.

 

Office 9 to 5 doesn’t interest you

Instead of sitting in the same seat for 8 hours a day, nursing gives you the chance to be constantly on your feet and constantly undertaking diverse experiences.

A nurse can also work in a wide range of working environments, such as hospitals, schools, care homes, doctor’s offices, military bases and many more. It is a career overflowing with flexibility, and it offers flexible scheduling needs such as working nights, weekends, and incremental shifts.

 

You want a job where you can progress

There are multiple career paths that you can follow in a nursing career, such as becoming a practitioner, or concentrating on a speciality such as Certified Bariatric Nurse, Dialysis Nurse and Radiologic Nurse.

Nurses with specialisations often have a higher earning potential, and the chance to gain new and specific skills and experience is something that nurses can attain multiple times throughout their career, if and when they feel a change is needed.

Experienced nurses can help with educating and training a new generation of nurses at colleges in order to earn extra money, as well as being able to become an instructor, teaching CPR and First Aid classes.

 

You want an interesting, stimulating career

Nursing is unlikely to ever be dull if you thrive on being challenged. Every day will be challenging and varied. You will meet a lot of different people and will always be learning and implementing new things.

Nursing is an exciting profession, and can take you down a wide range of career routes. If you begin as a hospital nurse, there is no reason why you may not end up working as a travel, flight, research or emergency room nurse.

Stimulating, you will always be challenged intellectually while making a huge difference in somebody else’s life.

 

You want to be in demand

Last, but certainly not least – is one vital reason to join the nursing filed, and that is to help people when there is a shortage of nurses in the UK. There is plenty of opportunity, and lots of places at university remain open.

Nurses are in demand, and this will only increase as the population continues to grow, and people keep living longer, making there a clear need for more health care services.

David Lewis, managing director, integra people, warrington

 
 
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